One Hell of An Eye
The Official Blog of Mike Salisbury
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Henri Cartier-Bresson (August 22, 1908 – August 3, 2004) was a French photographer considered to be the father of modern photojournalism. He was an early adopter of 35mm format, and the master of candid photography. He helped develop the “street photography” or “real life reportage” style.

Wikipedia

The inspiration is Cartier-Bresson; the photos that follow are some of mine…enjoy. M.S.

 

 

Apparently he’s not amused by the mockery.

(photo by Mike Salisbury)

 

Is that the size of your chinchilla or are you just happy to see us, Doctor Richardson?

(photo by Mike Salisbury)

 

Balkan eyes.

(photo by Mike Salisbury)

 

Midnight in the Twilight Zone.

(photo by Mike Salisbury)

 

Funeral cortege. Granada, Nicaragua.

(photo by Mike Salisbury)



Which twin has the Toni?

(photo by Mike Salisbury)

 

La Famille Jacques.

(photo by Mike Salisbury)

 

Cor blimey, there’s the bloody lion!

(photo by Mike Salisbury)

 

Decisive moment. Paris.

(photo by Mike Salisbury)

 

Can we  get the standard shift instead?

(photo by Mike Salisbury)

 

La Dolce Vida.

(photo by Mike Salisbury)

 

L.A. County Fair.

(photo by Mike Salisbury)

 

Nun, Nixon, Naples.

(photo by Mike Salisbury)

A couple of wild and crazy guys hittin’ on the help.

(photo by Mike Salisbury)

 

 

Ben Her.

(photo by Mike Salisbury)

 

 

Cold War Communist country hotel interior decorating?

Apparently the party spared the expense.

(photo by Mike Salisbury)

 

 

(photo by Mike Salisbury)

To be continued…

Comments:

Happy New Year, Mike. Love the pics. I really liked the World’s Automatic Bible counter. Looks like they are waiting for their fries while hearing a quick reading! Mark A.

The best of white trash! MS

As for “Apparently he’s not amused,” who’s that, anyway? Tim G.

Some old guy in an amusement park in England. MS

Cartier-Bresson’s stuff so often stops me with a clunk…pensive, and what the heck? When book scouting, I learned the names to buy at the time: his, Brassai, Yousouf Karsh. I got my first copy of The Decisive Moment, awful spine with loads of tape, which in the hotel room that night I sozzled in lighter fluid. Your page always gets me thinking. Thanks! Joe T.

Thanks, Joe. It is a good book. MS

Thanks, Mike. I enjoy your postings so much. Cartier-Bresson (along with Diana Arbus) are among my favorite photographers of the “common man.” Fred D.

So please do tell, what is with you + photography? Yeah I know, you were shooting even 20 years before you were my teacher @ ACCD. And for many designers, art + creative directors who hire + supervise photography in their work, shooting their own is to many, just an extension of it. But with digital, it has gotten a bit dangerous in blurring the lines. The reality is that I cannot do what you do and you cannot do what I do. I see it as both are OK + neither is a problem. But unlike yourself, who actually does indeed have a very keen eye for so many different creative media, most folks really do not. The other reality is sad, as today, every asshole who grows a beard + next goes to Costco to buy a digital SLR, actually does truly believe they can do what I do. Photography, like law + medicine, is a biz we call “practicing”. I did professional work before ACCD, so I was allowed to start as a 2nd semester student. I grad. (next month) 36 years ago + honestly am still practicing + improving all the time. I now do a such a better job in 2 hrs. than I did in 2 days as student from of all this practice.

Unarguably, H.C. Bresson was a seminal figure in modern photojournalism + yes, he made many memorable images. My beef with the guy is that as I know it, he was born with the silver spoon in his mouth. That begs the question, what if any of us never had to pay any dues, never shoot ugly little electronic widgets on white seamless for some little agency in O.C. nobody every heard of, for a very ugly ad nobody will see except those who subscribed to “Weirdo Nerd Electronics Parts Magazine”, but the $2,500 fee + expenses was much needed to keep our even a modest little studio going? If we all had the opportunity to wake up each morning, just stroll around the park with our Leica M3’s (because they are near silent) looking for things that catch our eye without other responsibilities, I’ll bet it that even the Average Joe might come up with much of what your buddy, Henri did. Unlike so many of the rich shits who were your students, I worked many crap jobs like selling cameras with a necktie on every weekend at 2 Dept. stores, later a camera shop, all at min. wage. Also a B&W lab, where I was the “Print Wash + Dry Boy”, the lowest ranking employee. There my nails turned dark yellow from all the “Fixer”, not because of any lack of personal hygiene. I was thrilled just to be working in the field anyway I could. While my oldest buddy since elementary school, Kevin, worked at Jack in the Box graveyard shift wearing a hair net under a silly paper hat, while he was in college. I always stayed out of ACCD during the summers to work full time to save dough for my school assignments. Am I bitter? Not a bit. A little jealous? OK, you win……… maybe just a little. But working hard never ruined anybody; it made + keeps us humble. Keep up the good work + Happy New Year.  Pete B.

Thanks, Pete. MS

Mike, thanks for your picture posts. They help me begin to recognize things. It’s easier to see it once it’s caught and delivered. But when I ride the earth, I feel like I begin to see things as a result of being shown patterns once only recognized by others. Life’s more fun.  Mark H.